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2018 Fall Conference

  • 19 Oct 2018
  • 8:00 AM
  • 20 Oct 2018
  • 4:00 PM
  • East Jefferson General Hospital

Registration

Friday, October 19, 2018

Track 1: Mindfulness & Zentangle: Science, Health & Happiness....even when you think you don't have time! (6 hours)

Track 2: Measurement of Adult Neurological Outcomes in

Occupational Therapy (4 hours) and  (2 hours)

Track 3: Orthopedic Course (8 hours)

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Track 1: Knowing our Clients: How to facilitate health in clients with co-morbid mental health diagnoses (6 hours)

Track 2: Therapeutic Use of Self (4 hours) and (2 hours)

Track 3: Pediatric Feeding (2 hours) and (4 hours)

Day One:

Track 1: Mindfulness & Zentangle: Science, Health & Happiness....even when you think you don't have time! (6 hours)

Evetts and Peloquin (2017, p.3) identified to be a mindful occupational therapy practitioner one must: "possess a deep understanding of persons and therapy, logical activity analysis, and imaginative activity synthesis." In our ever busy therapy world of increasing productivity demands, evidence based practice and decreased lengths of stay, have we forgotten our roots and feel forced to engaged in mindless reductionistic tasks such as exercise and cone stacking? Plan to attend this session to increase your personal and professional mindfulness skills and engagement in therapy. Learn specific techniques which can be used in the clinic the day after this presentation with any population.

Abstract: Mindfulness programs, developed over the past several decades, have been implemented as a tool to address issues of well being and mental health in a variety of populations. Structured mindfulness programs have the potential to help adults in improve their own well-being. Studies have shown that these programs are associated with outcomes such as decreased stress, improved coping skills, increases in emotional intelligence, and increased productivity in the work setting (Mars & Oliver, 2016). Mindfulness: paying attention, without judgment, in the present moment. How many occupational therapy practitioners feel as if they are going through their day in autopilot. What are the impacts of this type of behavior in the clinical setting? This presentation provides an overview of the Koru mindfulness approach based upon research from Duke University. Participants will also be afforded the opportunity to engaged in a creative media: Zentangle which can be translated to use in a variety of clinical settings.

1. Identify how Mindfulness, the skill of learning to pay attention, without judgment, to one’s present–moment experience, can improve well-being in diverse populations.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of 2-3 to evidence-based Koru Mindfulness techniques to assist in improving sleep and concentration while reducing stress.

3. Demonstrate understanding of Zentangle theory, through creating a mindful focus of "art" using one stroke at a time, in a context where there are "no mistakes". Anything is possible, one stroke at a time.

4. Explore the direct mindful benefits which can be obtained through engagement in Zentangle "art" including: relaxation, increased self compassion, exploration of creativity, inspiration, relieve stress, increased attention & concentration among many others.

Christine Urish, PhD, OTR/L, BCMH, FAOTA is Professor of Occupational Therapy at Drake University in Des Moines, IA where she is responsible for teaching entry level OTD students psychosocial content and is the Doctoral Experiential Coordinator. She received BS (’89) and MS (’93) in OT from Western Michigan University and PhD from the University of Iowa (2005). She maintains a PRN clinical practice at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics in behavioral health across the lifespan in inpatient and partial hospitalization programs as well as medical psychiatry.  

Track 2: Measurement of Adult Neurological Outcomes in

Occupational Therapy (4 hours) and  (2 hours)

Learn about easy assessments you can use to standardize your practice and report patient outcomes more effectively

Course Objectives:

Following attendance at the seminar, participants will be able to:

1. Define the importance of using standardized measures in occupational therapy practice and report the quality and reimbursement related implications.

2.  Examine various measurement tools, tests, instruments, scales, and assessments that can be used in the practice of the adult neurological client.

3. Discuss administration and scoring issues associated with standardized measurement.

4. Assess the utility of appropriate measures for their individual practice.

5. Develop methods to incorporate these tools post-training

Barbara M. Doucet, PhD, LOTR- Dr. Doucet received her doctorate in Kinesiology in 1997 and has 34 years of clinical experience with the neurological population, specializing in treatment of persons with chronic stroke. Her research focuses on motor and functional recovery in chronic state. She oversees the Free Stroke Clinic that is embed within the OT curriculum at LSUHSC and supported by a Christopher & Dana Reeve grant. She instructs the research coursework in the LSUHSC OT curriculum.

Day Two:

Track 1: Knowing our Clients: How to facilitate health in clients with co-morbid mental health diagnoses (6 hours)

Objectives

  1. Define therapeutic modes of interpersonal interaction (advocating, collaborating, empathizing, encouraging, instructing, problem solving
  2. Identify from completion of self-assessment which mode of communication the OT practitioner tends to gravitate toward and how to facilitate development and utilization of other modes of interpersonal interaction
  3. Identify common signs and symptoms of mental health diagnoses seen in various clinical areas and impact upon OT practitioner (and other healthcare professionals) interaction, motivation, client engagement, and successful intervention/treatment
  4. Identify two to five strategies/resources to facilitate client success at discharge

Content covered within the session:

Who are our patients/clients? What concerns do they bring to therapy/healthcare? What defines a “good” therapist? Knowing ourselves: Understanding the therapeutic modes of communication & interaction. Challenges presented by the client. Inevitable events in healthcare. Therapy strategies for motivating challenging clients navigating therapeutic challenges. Managing difficulty behavior/environments, resolving conflict, empathy, and working effectively with others. Over view of signs/symptoms of common MH diagnoses seen in acute care, home health, IP Rehab, OP Neuro/Ortho, Skilled care and impact upon care. How to engage in therapeutic process. Planning for discharge, resources, strategies for client success for client and practitioner.

Christine Urish, PhD, OTR/L, BCMH, FAOTA is Professor of Occupational Therapy at Drake University in Des Moines, IA where she is responsible for teaching entry level OTD students psychosocial content and is the Doctoral Experiential Coordinator. She received BS (’89) and MS (’93) in OT from Western Michigan University and PhD from the University of Iowa (2005). She maintains a PRN clinical practice at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics in behavioral health across the lifespan in inpatient and partial hospitalization programs as well as medical psychiatry.  


lalwood@aol.com

(225) 291-2806

LOTA, PO Box 14806

Baton Rouge, LA 70898


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